Standing Stone Brewing Company

One-Mile Farm

Our One Mile Farm – As Local As It Gets!

Farm Entry

 

At Standing Stone, we are all proud of our commitment to local, organically grown and raised foods.  We especially appreciate the hard work of all the local farmers who provide the raw ingredients for much of our fare. Whether it’s hops from Alpha Beta Hop Farm  going into our handmade ales, or veggies from Fry Family Farms finding their way into one of Chef Javier’s awesome specials, we nurture relationships with like-minded food producers throughout the Rogue Valley.

When Standing Stone moved to make sourcing even more local by raising our own beef, we were especially excited and proud to work with Dave Westerberg of Valley View Farms . For years, Dave has used holistic, organic and sustainable farming practices raising cattle here in Ashland.  These practices are better for the cattle, the environment and consumers, and Dave’s farm presented the model we wanted to follow raising our own beef

Dave has brought his expertise and care to our One Mile Farm, 265 acres of pasture just down the street, where Standing Stone produces ALL of the beef products served in our restaurant, along with almost all of our lamb as well (Not to mention our buzzing bees producing honey used in our ales and sauces). The 50 or so cattle and 30 plus ewes we’re raising graze freely on open pasture using a management-intensive rotational system that helps rejuvenate the grass and soil, with the herds moved from one section to another sequentially.

One Mile Cow

The land and the cattle are chemical free – no fertilizers, antibiotics or hormones are used. This means that we only serve a very full-flavored grass-fed beef that’s humanely raised and free of chemicals. Not only does our grass-fed beef have health benefits such as higher Omega 3’s and key vitamins, it also contains lower saturated fat and cholesterol versus conventional beef.  On the environmental side, pastured beef systems have lower carbon emissions than feedlot-raised cattle, and help sequester carbon.

When it is time to take the cattle to slaughter, we bring the meat back to the restaurant in halves and quarters. Our trained kitchen staff performs all the butchering in house. It takes a full day of two or three chefs working around the clock to properly cut the beef. The burgers are fresh-ground and the steaks are specially cut.

So the next time you come down to the Standing Stone for a refreshing ale and dinner, and see the specialty steak of the day on the specials board, you can dine assured that the cut is freshly prepared and the meat came straight from a sustainable, humane farm right next door.

 

 

7th Annual Pumpkins & Pints

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Mark your calendar, hold all phone calls, and reschedule all meetings. Pumpkins and Pints is Sunday, October 25th from 12pm-5pm. This annual autumn get-together started with a small group of Standing Stone employees who gathered at the brewpub in October to carve pumpkins with their families. Years later, it has grown to be our biggest event of the year. In 2014 we welcomed hundreds of guests to our farm to carve pumpkins, enjoy BBQ and beer, play games, run amok, and help us celebrate a beautiful southern Oregon day (last year was sunny and 70 degrees). We invite you to come help us do the same in 2015!

hay balesHere’s what’s on the books for this year: weather permitting, we’ll hold the event at One Mile Farm, just down the road from Standing Stone. We’ll provide the pumpkins and carving tools (you’re welcome to bring your own if you take pumpkin carving really seriously), and you just show up with your creative ideas. You can purchase beer, hard cider, lemonade, brats and burgers once you’ve worked up a hearty appetite. We’ll have live music with Swift Pony and Special Guest Sam Cathcart (you can visit their new music store, Hilltop Music Shop, in Ashland) and games to keep kids of all ages entertained.

To get to the farm, follow Oak Street from Standing Stone to the very bottom, where it meets Eagle Mill Road. Take a right, go under the overpass, and find the entrance to our farm immediately after the bridge on the left side of the road. Limited parking is available on the roadside, so we suggest biking to the event to take advantage of front-row, two-wheeled parking inside our pasture. And if these directions are just too confusing, plug in the farm address to your Maps app: 1469 Eagle Mill Road in Ashland.

pastureIf the weather turns sour, our PLAN B is bringing all the pumpkins back to Standing Stone for an indoor/patio event at the brewpub. We’ll call the weather one week prior (check back here or on our social media pages), so you’ll know well in advance where to find us. If the week before is wet, but the event day is sunny, we’ll do it all on the patio outside at the brewpub to avoid the mud and still get some fall-fresh air.

The event is free and family-friendly! And if the weather lets us play at the farm, dogs on leashes are welcome, too. We’re excited to see you all elbow-deep scraping seeds and creating great jack-o-lanterns. Bring along your farm boots and cozy clothes, and we’ll all have some good, old-fashioned autumn time fun!

Meet Ruby.

rubyWhen we started our One Mile Farm in 2011, we knew we wanted some security on our pastures. The brewery is a mile away and as much as we love being out there with the animals and fresh air, there’s still beer to be made!  So we did some research, drove to Portland, and picked up our three Anatolian Shepherd puppies to be our new farm dogs. Stone, IPA, and Ruby have been staples of our farm from the beginning. Unfortunately, life on the farm hasn’t been ideal for Ruby, and we’re sad to say it’s time to find her a new home. We’re hoping you can help us!

Ruby is a sweet, shy 90 pound girl. She gets lonely on the farm and tends to wander off when there isn’t anyone around. She usually meanders towards houses with kids, and loves to be around people. When she wanders away she always comes back, but we worry about her on the road. She’s accustomed to sleeping outside and gets shy if you ask her to come in. In fact, she hasn’t spent much time indoors at all, so we can’t say what her inside behavior would be. Outdoors, this three year-old is fun and loving.

ruby and brothers

Ruby and her brothers as puppies (she’s the one on the left, snuggling).

Ruby would do well in a home with room to roam. She would also benefit from people around her often, as she loves attention. Chickens and small animals can agitate her, and she would need to meet any other dogs in the family. She’s happiest when she can play outside with people, and is eager to please. If you came to our Pumpkins and Pints event this year, you may have seen her lounging in the sun by the trailer watching everyone have a good time.

This lady has led a simple life – she likes sleeping in dirt and hasn’t spent much time on a leash. She is all up to date on shots and healthy as can be. By nature, Anatolian Shepherds are powerful, intelligent and loyal, and Ruby is no exception.

We want to find Ruby a happy home where she can feel comfortable and at-ease, and we’re hoping you can help us. Tell your friends, and your friends’ friends! If you’re interested in meeting Ruby or learning more, email Alex at alex@standingstonebrewing.com.

6th Annual Pumpkins & Pints in Our Pasture

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(photo: M. Pecoraro)

UPDATE: The weather looks great today, sunny and 70! We’ll see everyone at the farm (1469 Eagle Mill Rd. in Ashland), 12-5pm. To get there: follow Oak St. to the bottom, then turn right on Eagle Mill. The farm entrance is the first driveway on the left after going under the freeway overpass. Car parking is available along the roadside, and bikes are welcome on the pasture. See you this afternoon!

Standing Stone’s annual autumn-time party is just around the corner! Bring your friends, family and farm boots to the 6th Annual Pumpkins and Pints on Our Pasture, at our brewery’s One Mile Farm in Ashland. This all-ages event is Sunday, October 19th from Noon to 5pm. We’ll provide pumpkins, carving tools, and live music– you just show up for some fall-time fun!

One Mile Farm is home to our herds of livestock that provide fresh meat for our brewpub. We also keep bees and process compost on the land, reducing our restaurant’s waste and putting nutrients back into the soil. We’ll have farm staff on hand to answer any questions you have about our four year-old Farm Project, and introduce you to our friendly farm dogs, Stone and IPA. If you plan on stomping around our pasture a bit, we suggest boots to stay warm and dry.

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Foxfire Trio

This year, we look forward to live music with Foxfire Trio (2:15-5pm). Bob Evoniuk, Jeff Jones and Glenn Freese will provide upbeat, progressive bluegrass for all to enjoy while sipping beer and snacking on fare from the grill. We’re looking forward to One Mile Farm burgers and hot dogs, as well as cookies to snack on for the kiddos.  OktoberfestI Heart Oregon Ale, and Apple Bandit Hard Cider will flow from the taps, as well as Cherry Lemonade for those wanting an all-ages drink. We’ll have a card-reader available for purchases, and One Mile Farm logo tees on hand in men, women and kid sizes.

To get to the farm, follow Oak Street from Standing Stone to the very bottom, where it meets Eagle Mill Road. Take a right, go under the overpass, and find the entrance to our farm immediately after the bridge on the left side of the road. Limited parking is available on the roadside, so we suggest biking to the event to take advantage of front-row, two-wheeled parking inside our pasture.

In case the weather turns sour (but we don’t think it will), we’ll hold the event at the brewery in downtown Ashland. You’ll find a cozy pumpkin-carving space either on our patio or in our dining room, with all beers on tap and a full menu available. We’ll be sure to keep everyone updated via our News on Tap blog, Facebook pageTwitter and website calendar. You can also call the brewpub on the day of Pumpkins and Pints to double-check on the location of the festivities: (541) 482-2448.

We hope to see you there with carving ideas and hearty appetites! We’ll set up a photo area (new this year) for you to snap shots with your Halloween-ready pumpkins. We’re excited to make 2014 the best Pumpkins and Pints yet!

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(photo: M. Pecoraro)

Chomp Down & Drink Up for Eat Local Week, 9/12-21

CelebrationBannerNoWebTomorrow marks the beginning of Southern Oregon’s annual Eat Local Week, presented by Thrive (The Rogue Initiative for a Vital Economy). September 12th-21st local businesses and community members join the fun by focusing on locally grown and produced fare. Our region is home to exceptionally tasty and fresh ingredients to relish at the table – we encourage you to eat and drink local all week long!

At Standing Stone Brewing Co., we place a big emphasis on local ingredients, for both our food and our brews. Our menu is chock-full of dishes with elements from our One Mile Farm (beef, poultry, eggs, lamb and honey), as well as house-made products to ensure the freshest and tastiest food for our customers and employees. Here are a handful of items you can find on our menu year-round with locally grown and/or created makings:

Standing Stone Cheeseburger: Housemade bun, One Mile Farm beef, Rogue Creamery Stout Cheddar, housemade mayo (with eggs from One Mile Farm), housemade pickles, & Garlic Fries made with organic potatoes grown in Klamath Falls.

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Saturday Growers & Crafters Market in front of Standing Stone on Oak Street

Steak Tacos: One Mile Farm beef with Noble Coffee and chili rub, Stout glaze, Housemade Organic Corn Tortillas, Housemade salsas, & pickled local radishes (in season).

Salmon Omelet: One Mile Farm eggs, line-caught Oregon Coast salmon, & organic potatoes from Klamath Falls.

Of course, we also take great pride in our locally brewed beer! Our I Heart Oregon Ale is made exclusively with Oregon-grown ingredients, including hops from Alpha Beta Hop Farm in Ashland and Goschie Farms in Silverton (learn more about their Salmon Safe certification). We recently tapped our first sour beer, Freestone Sour, brewed with 130 lbs. of fresh peaches from Rolling Hills Farm in Talent, Ore. Finally, our Noble Stout is made with cold-brewed Mokha Java coffee from Noble Coffee Roasting here in Ashland. Fresh is best when it comes to both food and beer!

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Our happy cows on One Mile Farm

Dive into more Rogue Valley fun with these other Eat Local celebration ideas throughout the week:

  • Pledge to eat local all week with the Eat Local Challenge – choose to be a nibbler, feaster, local lover, or locavore. Record your participation and submit photos on Facebook, Instrgram or Twitter with the tag #eatlocalrogue. You’ll be entered to win gift certificates from local restaurants and more.
  • Visit your favorite weekly Growers and Crafters Markets and meet the farmers and producers this week is all about! For added tasty fun, look for the annual Great Tomato Tasting, with heirloom, cherry & hybrid tomatoes.
  • Check out demos around the valley, focusing on local and responsible food sourcing. Our favorite picks: Noble Coffee’s Public Cupping Event (9/18 at 11am) and daily food demos at the Ashland Food Co-Op.

You can also join our monthly farm tour on Sunday, September 21st at 11am. Our farm manager will guide you through our pastures to peek on our farm animals and get a feel for our overall operations. At the brewpub, we’ll offer even more daily specials throughout the week with ingredients from local farmers and producers. Be sure to check out our specials board and ask your server what’s fresh and new! We’ll also post photos of our specials board to our Twitter and Facebook pages all week so you can see what’s brewing and cooking at Standing Stone everyday during the celebration. Happy Eat Local Week to all!

3 Lessons We Learned at Bee School

Last weekend our Standing Stone beekeepers attended an all-day bee school, hosted by Southern Oregon Beekeepers Association (SOBA).  The guest speaker, Lincoln Mettler of Mountain Rain Bee Products in WA, is a beekeeper of 35 years, and at one time had 2,500 hives by himself! In comparison, we’re going into our third year of beekeeping on our One Mile Farm and have two happy hives. Nonetheless, Lincoln had great advice for all varieties of beekeepers, and we took away lots of information to guide us in our future bee-care efforts.

Though we accumulated six full pages of beekeeping notes and drawings (our brains are buzzing with information!), here are the three major lessons we learned from a day at bee school:

bee hivesKeep a journal.

Feeding, harvesting honey, splitting hives, and treating for mites all require keeping track of dates. Bees run a tight ship and operate on a schedule, and so should any good beekeeper. Keeping a journal handy near your hive will help you remember when you last visited, what you did, and when you need to come back. It will also help you keep track of what worked or didn’t work year to year. There’s a lot that can happen within a hive, and every hive is different. Write down your thoughts, methods, and dates to keep a good history and move forward.

Tap into your local beekeepers association.

Our area beekeepers association, SOBA, is a wealth of information and resources. SOBA sends out newsletters, hosts workshops, offers seasonal tips and reminders, and connects beekeepers with one another to share stories, failures and successes. SOBA also works with local retailers to keep beekeeping supplies in stock, and has a honey extractor for members to rent. Check into your local beekeepers associations and clubs, and seek out other beekeepers nearby.

Bee Girl, a local advocate for beekeeping, conservation and education, helped us get started with our hives three years ago, and offers classes, workshops, and one-on-one hives visits. We recommend tapping into your local beekeeping experts, and looking into beekeeping mentoring programs. Remember, beekeeping methods can differ based on climate and surroundings, so learn what others are doing locally to maintain thriving hives.

beesKnow that everyone does it differently.

It turns out, there’s no one way to keep bees. There are lots of ways people keep bees! Beekeepers’ methods differ depending on whether you’re hoping to harvest honey to sell or enjoy at home, pollinate fields, or just spend time with bees as a hobby. Some people re-queen their hives every year, while some let a successful queen run her course. Some people do mite-rolls (a mite-counting method) with powdered sugar, and some swear by rubbing alcohol. Some harvest once in summer, and some harvest all spring and summer long. Learn about different possibilities and decide what’s best for you and your hive. And give yourself a break if you find out your doing something a little different than your neighbor.

Lastly, a big thank you to Shastina Millwork and Ruhl Bee for donating wonderful goodies for the bee school raffle. We won a new hive tool and will certainly put it to good use practicing the new methods we learned last weekend!

Chickens, Cows & Lambs, Oh My!

one mile farm entrance

Due to popular demand, we’re launching new monthly farm tours on Standing Stone’s One Mile Farm! Grab your favorite pair of boots and head down Oak Street for a walk around our brewpub’s pasture. The farm staff will lead summer tours every third Sunday of the month, May through October, starting at 11am.

 

Nearly three years ago we launched our farm project on Eagle Mill Road in Ashland, Ore. just a mile from our downtown brewery. Through leasing 265 acres from the City of Ashland we’ve been able to raise cows, chickens and lambs to provide protein for our restaurant’s menu. We also keep beehives for sweet honey harvesting and pollinating our pastures.

 

These farming practices give us the freshest ingredients possible for burgers, breakfasts, specials and more on our menu. Last year, we built an Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA)-licensed chicken and egg room (also called an abattoir) to do all our poultry processing in-house. We govern where our food comes from, how it’s handled, and how it makes its way into our favorite dishes. We feel this process gives us the freshest, healthiest and tastiest options possible when it comes to meat and eggs for our menu.

 

lambs

(photo: Marina Pecoraro)

In recent farm happenings, we welcomed 35 baby lambs this spring! Our herd of cows has grown to 37, easily supplying all the beef we need for our brewpub’s menu. Our composting operations are continuously turning brewpub by-products, like food scraps and biodegradable to-go ware, into rich compost material. Lastly, the three farm dogs, Stone, Ruby and IPA, turn three years old this summer. Happy birthday, kiddos!

 

How to get there: From Standing Stone Brewing Co. downtown, head down Oak Street to the very bottom. At Eagle Mill Road, take a right and continue under the freeway. Immediately after the underpass you’ll see One Mile Farm on the left. If you’re driving, we recommend parking on the road to avoid mud and parking jams on the farmland. Or, you can easily ride your bike for the mile trip from the brewpub.

 

Gather your family and friends for a fun, easy Sunday activity. Our next tour lands on June 15th, Father’s Day, so grab Dad for a late morning walk through our fields. Come see why we love raising our own animals and fostering a close relationship with the food we put on Standing Stone’s tables. Afterward, trek back up to the brewpub and top off your journey with your favorite craft beer.

 

By in Food, Standing Stone Farm 0

The New Take-Out: Beef & Beer From Your Local Brewery

We’re beefing up our farm-fresh food offerings with Standing Stone’s Onebutchering Mile Farm beef to-go. Our grass-fed, hormone- and antibiotic-free Black Angus cattle are the source for our burgers, shredded beef quesadillas, nachos, soups and daily steak specials. Now you can take One Mile Farm beef home for your own sustainably-raised fare for the dinner table.

We started One Mile Farm over two years ago, located just down Oak Street a mile from the brewpub. There we raise cattle, chickens and lambs that give us lots of local protein for our kitchen. We value knowing our own Standing Stone employees raise these animals humanely, with care to their environment and diets. They graze around our 265-acre pasture in a rotational system, benefitting the land and animals with natural farming methods.cow

So why is grass-fed beef a smarter protein option? Grass-fed beef has been shown to have less overall fat and calories and higher Omega 3s than their grain-fed counterparts. The animals consume a natural, grazing diet, rather than beefing up on soy, corn, grains and other supplements in closed feedlots. Our happy cows are free of antibiotics and hormones because they stay healthy naturally, getting plenty of fresh air and space to roam.

We think these happy cattle give us the best-quality beef for our tables! Our kitchen staff has been trained to butcher all our meat in-house, and now they are preparing specialty cuts and ground beef patties for our customers to take home.

Here’s how it works: We have rotating specialty cuts available everyday. Come in or call to see what’s wrapped and ready to go. If you’re planning a special event, we can also put you in touch with our butcher who can prepare cuts for special orders. Then, you take home your local, free-range beef and cook up delectable meals for yourself and loved-ones!local beef burger on focaccia

Please call the brewpub to learn more about today’s retail beef offerings and pricing: (541) 261-0021. When you pick up your beef, grab a growler of Standing Stone beer to-go and make a full meal of locally crafted fare. We suggest Twin Plunge Double IPA with burgers, I Heart Oregon Ale with spicy Mexican-style dishes, and Steel-Cut Stout with a grilled filet. Make your next meal exceptional with local beef and beer from your neighborhood brewery!

Another Great Turnout for Pumpkins and Pints

This year’s Pumpkins and Pints was a smashing success down on One-Mile Farm! Hundreds of pumpkin-carving, music-loving friends and family came out to make this one of the best years ever. And thanks to the Turner Moore Band for providing the tunes to help make this, our 5th annual event, so much fun.

We are also happy to get a chance to share the Standing Stone Brewing Co. Farm Project with the community. This is where we source all our eggs, beef and poultry for the brewpub, keeping the food loop as close to home as we can. We also compost the all restaurant’s food waste there, keeping it out of landfills.

Thanks again to all for coming out! Here’s a look at some of the fun!

(*All photos by Marina Pecoraro)

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