Standing Stone Brewing Company

Standing Stone Farm

6th Annual Pumpkins & Pints in Our Pasture

sign

(photo: M. Pecoraro)

UPDATE: The weather looks great today, sunny and 70! We’ll see everyone at the farm (1469 Eagle Mill Rd. in Ashland), 12-5pm. To get there: follow Oak St. to the bottom, then turn right on Eagle Mill. The farm entrance is the first driveway on the left after going under the freeway overpass. Car parking is available along the roadside, and bikes are welcome on the pasture. See you this afternoon!

Standing Stone’s annual autumn-time party is just around the corner! Bring your friends, family and farm boots to the 6th Annual Pumpkins and Pints on Our Pasture, at our brewery’s One Mile Farm in Ashland. This all-ages event is Sunday, October 19th from Noon to 5pm. We’ll provide pumpkins, carving tools, and live music– you just show up for some fall-time fun!

One Mile Farm is home to our herds of livestock that provide fresh meat for our brewpub. We also keep bees and process compost on the land, reducing our restaurant’s waste and putting nutrients back into the soil. We’ll have farm staff on hand to answer any questions you have about our four year-old Farm Project, and introduce you to our friendly farm dogs, Stone and IPA. If you plan on stomping around our pasture a bit, we suggest boots to stay warm and dry.

foxfire

Foxfire Trio

This year, we look forward to live music with Foxfire Trio (2:15-5pm). Bob Evoniuk, Jeff Jones and Glenn Freese will provide upbeat, progressive bluegrass for all to enjoy while sipping beer and snacking on fare from the grill. We’re looking forward to One Mile Farm burgers and hot dogs, as well as cookies to snack on for the kiddos.  OktoberfestI Heart Oregon Ale, and Apple Bandit Hard Cider will flow from the taps, as well as Cherry Lemonade for those wanting an all-ages drink. We’ll have a card-reader available for purchases, and One Mile Farm logo tees on hand in men, women and kid sizes.

To get to the farm, follow Oak Street from Standing Stone to the very bottom, where it meets Eagle Mill Road. Take a right, go under the overpass, and find the entrance to our farm immediately after the bridge on the left side of the road. Limited parking is available on the roadside, so we suggest biking to the event to take advantage of front-row, two-wheeled parking inside our pasture.

In case the weather turns sour (but we don’t think it will), we’ll hold the event at the brewery in downtown Ashland. You’ll find a cozy pumpkin-carving space either on our patio or in our dining room, with all beers on tap and a full menu available. We’ll be sure to keep everyone updated via our News on Tap blog, Facebook pageTwitter and website calendar. You can also call the brewpub on the day of Pumpkins and Pints to double-check on the location of the festivities: (541) 482-2448.

We hope to see you there with carving ideas and hearty appetites! We’ll set up a photo area (new this year) for you to snap shots with your Halloween-ready pumpkins. We’re excited to make 2014 the best Pumpkins and Pints yet!

collage

(photo: M. Pecoraro)

Chomp Down & Drink Up for Eat Local Week, 9/12-21

CelebrationBannerNoWebTomorrow marks the beginning of Southern Oregon’s annual Eat Local Week, presented by Thrive (The Rogue Initiative for a Vital Economy). September 12th-21st local businesses and community members join the fun by focusing on locally grown and produced fare. Our region is home to exceptionally tasty and fresh ingredients to relish at the table – we encourage you to eat and drink local all week long!

At Standing Stone Brewing Co., we place a big emphasis on local ingredients, for both our food and our brews. Our menu is chock-full of dishes with elements from our One Mile Farm (beef, poultry, eggs, lamb and honey), as well as house-made products to ensure the freshest and tastiest food for our customers and employees. Here are a handful of items you can find on our menu year-round with locally grown and/or created makings:

Standing Stone Cheeseburger: Housemade bun, One Mile Farm beef, Rogue Creamery Stout Cheddar, housemade mayo (with eggs from One Mile Farm), housemade pickles, & Garlic Fries made with organic potatoes grown in Klamath Falls.

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Saturday Growers & Crafters Market in front of Standing Stone on Oak Street

Steak Tacos: One Mile Farm beef with Noble Coffee and chili rub, Stout glaze, Housemade Organic Corn Tortillas, Housemade salsas, & pickled local radishes (in season).

Salmon Omelet: One Mile Farm eggs, line-caught Oregon Coast salmon, & organic potatoes from Klamath Falls.

Of course, we also take great pride in our locally brewed beer! Our I Heart Oregon Ale is made exclusively with Oregon-grown ingredients, including hops from Alpha Beta Hop Farm in Ashland and Goschie Farms in Silverton (learn more about their Salmon Safe certification). We recently tapped our first sour beer, Freestone Sour, brewed with 130 lbs. of fresh peaches from Rolling Hills Farm in Talent, Ore. Finally, our Noble Stout is made with cold-brewed Mokha Java coffee from Noble Coffee Roasting here in Ashland. Fresh is best when it comes to both food and beer!

free range cows

Our happy cows on One Mile Farm

Dive into more Rogue Valley fun with these other Eat Local celebration ideas throughout the week:

  • Pledge to eat local all week with the Eat Local Challenge – choose to be a nibbler, feaster, local lover, or locavore. Record your participation and submit photos on Facebook, Instrgram or Twitter with the tag #eatlocalrogue. You’ll be entered to win gift certificates from local restaurants and more.
  • Visit your favorite weekly Growers and Crafters Markets and meet the farmers and producers this week is all about! For added tasty fun, look for the annual Great Tomato Tasting, with heirloom, cherry & hybrid tomatoes.
  • Check out demos around the valley, focusing on local and responsible food sourcing. Our favorite picks: Noble Coffee’s Public Cupping Event (9/18 at 11am) and daily food demos at the Ashland Food Co-Op.

You can also join our monthly farm tour on Sunday, September 21st at 11am. Our farm manager will guide you through our pastures to peek on our farm animals and get a feel for our overall operations. At the brewpub, we’ll offer even more daily specials throughout the week with ingredients from local farmers and producers. Be sure to check out our specials board and ask your server what’s fresh and new! We’ll also post photos of our specials board to our Twitter and Facebook pages all week so you can see what’s brewing and cooking at Standing Stone everyday during the celebration. Happy Eat Local Week to all!

3 Lessons We Learned at Bee School

Last weekend our Standing Stone beekeepers attended an all-day bee school, hosted by Southern Oregon Beekeepers Association (SOBA).  The guest speaker, Lincoln Mettler of Mountain Rain Bee Products in WA, is a beekeeper of 35 years, and at one time had 2,500 hives by himself! In comparison, we’re going into our third year of beekeeping on our One Mile Farm and have two happy hives. Nonetheless, Lincoln had great advice for all varieties of beekeepers, and we took away lots of information to guide us in our future bee-care efforts.

Though we accumulated six full pages of beekeeping notes and drawings (our brains are buzzing with information!), here are the three major lessons we learned from a day at bee school:

bee hivesKeep a journal.

Feeding, harvesting honey, splitting hives, and treating for mites all require keeping track of dates. Bees run a tight ship and operate on a schedule, and so should any good beekeeper. Keeping a journal handy near your hive will help you remember when you last visited, what you did, and when you need to come back. It will also help you keep track of what worked or didn’t work year to year. There’s a lot that can happen within a hive, and every hive is different. Write down your thoughts, methods, and dates to keep a good history and move forward.

Tap into your local beekeepers association.

Our area beekeepers association, SOBA, is a wealth of information and resources. SOBA sends out newsletters, hosts workshops, offers seasonal tips and reminders, and connects beekeepers with one another to share stories, failures and successes. SOBA also works with local retailers to keep beekeeping supplies in stock, and has a honey extractor for members to rent. Check into your local beekeepers associations and clubs, and seek out other beekeepers nearby.

Bee Girl, a local advocate for beekeeping, conservation and education, helped us get started with our hives three years ago, and offers classes, workshops, and one-on-one hives visits. We recommend tapping into your local beekeeping experts, and looking into beekeeping mentoring programs. Remember, beekeeping methods can differ based on climate and surroundings, so learn what others are doing locally to maintain thriving hives.

beesKnow that everyone does it differently.

It turns out, there’s no one way to keep bees. There are lots of ways people keep bees! Beekeepers’ methods differ depending on whether you’re hoping to harvest honey to sell or enjoy at home, pollinate fields, or just spend time with bees as a hobby. Some people re-queen their hives every year, while some let a successful queen run her course. Some people do mite-rolls (a mite-counting method) with powdered sugar, and some swear by rubbing alcohol. Some harvest once in summer, and some harvest all spring and summer long. Learn about different possibilities and decide what’s best for you and your hive. And give yourself a break if you find out your doing something a little different than your neighbor.

Lastly, a big thank you to Shastina Millwork and Ruhl Bee for donating wonderful goodies for the bee school raffle. We won a new hive tool and will certainly put it to good use practicing the new methods we learned last weekend!

Chickens, Cows & Lambs, Oh My!

one mile farm entrance

Due to popular demand, we’re launching new monthly farm tours on Standing Stone’s One Mile Farm! Grab your favorite pair of boots and head down Oak Street for a walk around our brewpub’s pasture. The farm staff will lead summer tours every third Sunday of the month, May through October, starting at 11am.

 

Nearly three years ago we launched our farm project on Eagle Mill Road in Ashland, Ore. just a mile from our downtown brewery. Through leasing 265 acres from the City of Ashland we’ve been able to raise cows, chickens and lambs to provide protein for our restaurant’s menu. We also keep beehives for sweet honey harvesting and pollinating our pastures.

 

These farming practices give us the freshest ingredients possible for burgers, breakfasts, specials and more on our menu. Last year, we built an Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA)-licensed chicken and egg room (also called an abattoir) to do all our poultry processing in-house. We govern where our food comes from, how it’s handled, and how it makes its way into our favorite dishes. We feel this process gives us the freshest, healthiest and tastiest options possible when it comes to meat and eggs for our menu.

 

lambs

(photo: Marina Pecoraro)

In recent farm happenings, we welcomed 35 baby lambs this spring! Our herd of cows has grown to 37, easily supplying all the beef we need for our brewpub’s menu. Our composting operations are continuously turning brewpub by-products, like food scraps and biodegradable to-go ware, into rich compost material. Lastly, the three farm dogs, Stone, Ruby and IPA, turn three years old this summer. Happy birthday, kiddos!

 

How to get there: From Standing Stone Brewing Co. downtown, head down Oak Street to the very bottom. At Eagle Mill Road, take a right and continue under the freeway. Immediately after the underpass you’ll see One Mile Farm on the left. If you’re driving, we recommend parking on the road to avoid mud and parking jams on the farmland. Or, you can easily ride your bike for the mile trip from the brewpub.

 

Gather your family and friends for a fun, easy Sunday activity. Our next tour lands on June 15th, Father’s Day, so grab Dad for a late morning walk through our fields. Come see why we love raising our own animals and fostering a close relationship with the food we put on Standing Stone’s tables. Afterward, trek back up to the brewpub and top off your journey with your favorite craft beer.

 

By in Food, Standing Stone Farm 0

The New Take-Out: Beef & Beer From Your Local Brewery

We’re beefing up our farm-fresh food offerings with Standing Stone’s Onebutchering Mile Farm beef to-go. Our grass-fed, hormone- and antibiotic-free Black Angus cattle are the source for our burgers, shredded beef quesadillas, nachos, soups and daily steak specials. Now you can take One Mile Farm beef home for your own sustainably-raised fare for the dinner table.

We started One Mile Farm over two years ago, located just down Oak Street a mile from the brewpub. There we raise cattle, chickens and lambs that give us lots of local protein for our kitchen. We value knowing our own Standing Stone employees raise these animals humanely, with care to their environment and diets. They graze around our 265-acre pasture in a rotational system, benefitting the land and animals with natural farming methods.cow

So why is grass-fed beef a smarter protein option? Grass-fed beef has been shown to have less overall fat and calories and higher Omega 3s than their grain-fed counterparts. The animals consume a natural, grazing diet, rather than beefing up on soy, corn, grains and other supplements in closed feedlots. Our happy cows are free of antibiotics and hormones because they stay healthy naturally, getting plenty of fresh air and space to roam.

We think these happy cattle give us the best-quality beef for our tables! Our kitchen staff has been trained to butcher all our meat in-house, and now they are preparing specialty cuts and ground beef patties for our customers to take home.

Here’s how it works: We have rotating specialty cuts available everyday. Come in or call to see what’s wrapped and ready to go. If you’re planning a special event, we can also put you in touch with our butcher who can prepare cuts for special orders. Then, you take home your local, free-range beef and cook up delectable meals for yourself and loved-ones!local beef burger on focaccia

Please call the brewpub to learn more about today’s retail beef offerings and pricing: (541) 261-0021. When you pick up your beef, grab a growler of Standing Stone beer to-go and make a full meal of locally crafted fare. We suggest Twin Plunge Double IPA with burgers, I Heart Oregon Ale with spicy Mexican-style dishes, and Steel-Cut Stout with a grilled filet. Make your next meal exceptional with local beef and beer from your neighborhood brewery!

New on Tap: Wildtrail Ale

Once-again we are participating in Beers Made By Walking, a program that asks brewers to make beer inspired by plants found on nature walks. Our beer will be served during a special event, with other nature-infused brews, on October 26th at Belmont Station in Portland. The beer starts flowing at noon and some of the brewers will be available to talk from 2-4.

Michael Altman, a certified nutritionist and member of the American Herbalists Guild, blazed the trail this summer in our search for edible, flavorful, and medicinal plants for the brew. On our foray around Hyatt Reservoir,  we discovered yarrow, mint, elderflower, and St. John’s Wort among others.

Our friends at Beer Made by Walking say “yarrow, mint, and elderflower perhaps are most familiar in beer history. Yarrow has been used as a bittering agent in beer, providing some medicinal value, and was used in gruits before the widespread use of hops. Elderfower has been used recently in a few different commercial beers, and a recent cider. It is appealing to many because of it’s soft citrusy character. Mint has also been used in beer and is certainly more common in tea. It is likely that many of the mint beers have used commercially available mints, so the use of a variety growing wild in the landscape is certainly appealing.”

(*photo by Larry Chase)

Come taste the bounty of The Pacific Crest Trail with Yarrow and Saint John’s Wort! The style is similar to a braggot, which is an ale brewed with malt and honey. This light, amber colored ale with its spicy and floral aroma will leave you wanting more! Cheers!

Beer Made By Walking

Style:  Its Own Style 

Color:  Light Amber
Aroma:  Spicy and Floral
Mouthfeel:  Medium
Flavor:  Honey, Yarrow, Perception of sweetness with slight sour character
Alcohol:  6.9% abv
IBU:  15 (estimate)

Original Extract:  14.8 Plato (% sugar in the wort)

Malt

  • Organic 2-row
  • Briess Special Roast
  • Organic Carapils
  • Acidulated

Adjunct

  • Wildflower Honey (Willamette Valley) – 30% of fermentable sugar

Hops

  • Bittering:  Organic Magnum

Flavoring Plants – collected near Lake Hyatt

  • Yarrow
  • St. John’s Wort

Another Great Turnout for Pumpkins and Pints

This year’s Pumpkins and Pints was a smashing success down on One-Mile Farm! Hundreds of pumpkin-carving, music-loving friends and family came out to make this one of the best years ever. And thanks to the Turner Moore Band for providing the tunes to help make this, our 5th annual event, so much fun.

We are also happy to get a chance to share the Standing Stone Brewing Co. Farm Project with the community. This is where we source all our eggs, beef and poultry for the brewpub, keeping the food loop as close to home as we can. We also compost the all restaurant’s food waste there, keeping it out of landfills.

Thanks again to all for coming out! Here’s a look at some of the fun!

(*All photos by Marina Pecoraro)

*ImageIMG_9383-2 IMG_9276 IMG_9280 IMG_9299 IMG_9303 IMG_9305 IMG_9372 IMG_9379 IMG_9389 sign photo-81 IMG_9402 IMG_9393

5th Annual Pumpkins and Pints in Our Pasture

Ready your pumpkin-carving hands for the 5th Annual Pumpkins and Pints on Our Pasture! This family-friendly Standing Stone event is Sunday, October 20th from Noon-5pm. Bring your carving ideas, loved-ones and appetites for some old-fashioned, outdoor seasonal fun!landscape pumpkins and pints

This autumn-time party is in its fifth year, and we think it gets better and better every occasion. From its humble beginning at the brewpub with about 40 people in attendance, the event has grown to over 300 people the last two years, and we love that our community enjoys coming together over food, beer and fall festivities!

Weather permitting, we’ll host the event on our Standing Stone One Mile Farm on Eagle Mill Road in Ashland. This 265 acre parcel is home to the cows, chickens, lambs and bees that provide us with a local food source for our brewpub menu, and we love when they can be part of the celebration.

We’ll join our farm friends outdoors for fresh air, pumpkin carving, beer-on-tap, seasonal food from the grill, and live music with local talent, Turner Moore Band (1-4pm). We’ll supply the pumpkins and carving tools for making jack-o-lanterns, or you’re welcome to bring your own if you have a special squash in mind. Standing Stone beer, lemonade, burgers, bratwursts, hot dogs and more will be available for when you work up a thirst and appetite from all your carving.pumpkins and pints group 2

We’ll also have farm staff on hand to answer any questions you have about our 3 year-old Farm Project. We source all our eggs, beef and poultry for the brewpub from the animals on our pasture, keeping the food loop as close to home as we can. We also compost the all restaurant’s food waste, and harvest blackberries in season for special desserts and sauces. If you plan on walking around our pasture a bit, we suggest wearing rubber boots to keep your feet warm and dry.

To get to our farm, follow Oak Street from Standing Stone to the very bottom, where it converges with Eagle Mill Road. Take a right and go under the overpass. The entrance to our farm is immediately after the bridge on the left side of the road. Limited parking is available on the roadside, and we suggest biking to the event to take advantage of front-row, two-wheeled parking inside our gates. After all, isn’t getting fresh autumn air part of what this event is all about?jackolantern

We hope to see you there, making scary, smiley, senseless or strange jack-o-lanterns for Halloween! In case the weather is rainier than we hope, we’ll still hold the event at the brewery in downtown Ashland. We’ll be sure to keep everyone updated via our News on Tap blog, Facebook page, Twitter and website calendar. You can also call the brewpub on the day of Pumpkins and Pints to double-check on the location of the festivities: (541) 482-2448.

Where the Grain is Spent

mash tun grainIf you’ve stopped by the brewpub during lunchtime on a weekday, you’ve most likely seen our brewers shoveling spent grain from the mash tun – the large stainless steel tank by the front door. If you’ve ever wondered what becomes of the loads of sweet, soaked malt once the beer-in-the-making passes on to the next phase, look no further than your plate.

At Standing Stone we send all our spent grain to our farm down the road, aptly named One Mile Farm. Here, it’s divided up among cows and chickens who love the tasty treat. In return, they give us loads of eggs (found in our desserts, breakfast dishes and salads), as well as meat protein for our menu.

That’s right, the burgers in our kitchen come from cows that live just a mile from the free range cowsbrewpub! Our Black Angus cattle graze on 265 acres of pasture and enjoy an extra malty meal from time to time. Once mature, we take the cows to Roseburg, OR to a USDA facility where they give the meat back to us in quarters. We then do all the butchering in-house. The steaks and beef for tacos and cheesesteak sandwiches are hand-cut, and the burger meat is freshly ground daily. We then serve our local, free-range beef on housemade bread, buns, or tortillas prepared fresh every morning.

Pair any of our beers on tap with eggs, beef or farm chicken on our menu, and you’re enjoying the zero-waste efforts of our brewing operations.

Do you have interesting and creative ideas for reusing spent grain? We know lots of breweries and farms that do exchanges of malt for eggs and other produce, and we love the concept of sharing rewards. You can also compost spent grain in your yard, or use it in spent grain recipes (like these from the Brooklyn Brewshop) for bread, crackers, desserts more.

Latest Specialty Beer: 76 Hands Blackberry Ale

One of our favorite features at One Mile Farm, our Standing Stone farmland just down the road, is the abundance of blackberries in the late summer and early fall. Last year, we threw a harvest party and brought out employees to pick bucket-loads of berries for the brewpub. _DSC4224_edited-1We’re using 61 lbs of this 2012 harvest in our latest specialty beer: 76 Hands Blackberry Ale.

The beer name stems from the 38 employees who spent three mornings in September picking blackberries last year. Their collective 76 hands brought in enough sweet fruit for dessert specials, Blackberry BBQ Sauce and this newest summer beer. We want to thank all our employees who came back with purple-stained fingers and clothing, and buckets of berries, and raise a glass to their harvest!

About the Beer

This wheat-style beer has a light pink, grapefruit color with a hint of purple. The fruity aroma and slightly sweet and tart flavor are accompanied by a light body and mouthfeel. This is a refreshing summertime ale, and a never-before-made creation for Standing Stone. 4.1% abv, 7 IBU

Malt

• Organic Pilsner

One of our young volunteer helpers

One of our young volunteer helpers

• Organic Wheat

• Acidulated

Hops

• Bittering: Organic Magnum

Fruit

• 61 lbs blackberries picked from the Standing Stone’s One Mile Farm

Food Pairing Suggestions

The light body and fruity character of this beer make it a great pairing with fruit-forward desserts. We also like it with light-intensity entrees, like fish or salad. If you take some to-go, try garnishing your glass with some fresh berries for a seasonal and colorful twist. Here are a few suggestions from our menu:

• Marionberry Cobblermarioncobbler

• Blueberry Shortcake (seasonal special)

• House Greens with Walnuts and Balsamic Vinaigrette

• Calamari

• Fish and Chips

Come toast a pint to the onset of summer, and ask your server or bartender if they helped pick the berries in your beer! And let us know what you think, as we’ll be sure to try new, berry-licious recipes with our harvest in 2013.